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Faculty Career Development Series

Career Development Series

The ITHS Career Development Series consist of monthly lectures and workshops designed to provide junior faculty and investigators with tools, a forum for discussion, and learning opportunities to help advance their careers.

Topics

Topics are selected based on an annual needs assessment.

Example topics include:

  • How to Write an NIH K Award
  • Making the Most of your Mentor Relationship
  • Mastering Public Speaking as a Researcher
  • Communicating your Findings Visually
  • What really happens in an NIH Study Review

Where can I find a CDS event?

ITHS partners with several UW campus and WWAMI regional partners to ensure we reach and engage the translational workforce with each series. CDS events occur across the main UW campus, in the UW Medicine South Lake Union building, and are often captured on video and edited for online distribution to our regional partners. Many of our offerings are also broadcast live as webinars to allow for flexible viewing opportunities. Check out the calendar for specific upcoming event topics and locations.

Upcoming and Past Events

Apr
16
Fri
The Ins and Outs of Being a Good Research Mentor @ On-Line Event
Apr 16 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Description

This session will cover the top 10 things you need to help your mentees succeed. This includes knowing how to ask questions and listen to answers to help your mentees gain clarity and move forward, what you may have never learned when you were a student and wish you had, and how to help your mentee if they do not have academic peers in their department.

Pre-Work

Before the session:

  1. Consider what tools are you using now to work with your mentees?
  2. Consider what unique challenges have you faced in mentoring and what has helped you overcome them and be successful or not?
  3. Review this online mentoring guide: https://www.nap.edu/resource/25568/interactive/

Learning Objectives

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Be able to explain approaches for asking questions and engaging in active listening to help their mentees get clarity in their goals
  2. Be able to describe at least three qualities of a successful mentor-mentee relationship
  3. Be able to identify at least two resources to support you as a mentor

Event Schedule

  • 2:30-2:35pm (Pacific) – Welcome and Introduction
  • 2:35-3:30pm (Pacific) – Presentation
  • 3:30-3:55pm (Pacific) – Q&A
  • 3:55-4:00pm (Pacific) – Closing and Feedback Survey

About the Speaker

Dr. Alexandra AdamsAlexandra (Alex) Adams, MD, PhD, is the director of the Center for American Indian and Rural Health Equity (CAIRHE), a phase II NIH COBRE at Montana State University. She is professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health where she also practiced family medicine and pediatric obesity treatment. Dr. Adams has directed multiple clinical trials, received over $40 million of NIH and foundation funding, and has over 60 per-reviewed publications. The foundation for her leadership and research has been community-based participatory research (CBPR), working in partnership with underserved communities to understand and solve health challenges using both scientific rigor and crucial community knowledge.

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Apr
22
Thu
Acknowledging and Rewarding Interdisciplinary Research within Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Processes @ On-Line Event
Apr 22 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Description

This CDS offering will provide an overview of the current landscape and efforts by the ITHS Team Science core and colleagues to promote interdisciplinary research in the Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure (APT) processes at the UW and beyond. The ITHS Team Science Core will disseminate and describe their new APT Toolkit developed for early career faculty, department chairs, and APT committees. Strategies for writing goal statements, highlighting CVs and soliciting external reviewers’ expert at interdisciplinary research will be discussed during the session. Participants will also have the opportunity to sign-up for an APT Special Interest Group where you can learn more about future workshops and offerings.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe the importance of incorporating interdisciplinary research practices and language in the APT process
  2. Discuss current barriers and facilitators of interdisciplinary research
  3. Acquire access to the ITHS Team Science APT Toolkit to recognize, support, and reward interdisciplinary research and collaboration

Pre-Work

The following are optional pre-reads to introduce you to the topic.

765 KBPRE-READ – APT Survey Summary Report1 MBPRE-READ – ITHS Team Science APT Toolkit

Schedule of Activities

  • 11:00am-11:05am (Pacific) – Welcome and Intro
  • 11:05am-12:25pm (Pacific) – Presentation + Q&A
  • 12:25-12:30pm (Pacific) – Feedback Survey and Closing

About the Speakers

Brenda ZierlerBrenda Zierler, PhD, RN, FAAN serves as a professor in the UW Department of Biobehavioral Nursing & Health Informatics and as Director of Research, Training and Faculty Development for the UW Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, Research & Practice. Her research focuses on health systems/health services related to interprofessional (IP) collaborative practice (CP) to improve team functioning and patient and systems outcomes. She currently leads three grants related to IPCP (one focuses on leadership and team development; two on transforming practice for teams delivering care for underserved patients with heart failure).

Jonathan D. Posner, PhD, is the Richard and Victoria Harrington Professor for Engineering Innovation in Health in Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Family Medicine (adjunct) at University of Washington. He is a founder and the Director of UW’s Engineering Innovation in Health program that focuses on developing technical solutions to pressing challenges in health and healthcare. His research group works on a diverse set of need-driven research projects including medical devices, point-of-care in-vitro diagnostics, improved cookstoves for the developing world, and helmets that reduce the risk of concussion. He has founded two companies: VICIS focused on a football helmet that reduces the risk of concussion, and Phoresa focused on point-of-care diagnostics. He was UW Medicine’s Inventor of the Year in 2016.

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May
4
Tue
Implicit Bias in Health Care and Research @ On-Line Event
May 4 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Description

This interactive training is designed to help faculty and researchers counteract bias in health care and research through small and large group activities and discussions, videos, and reflections. The workshop will situate implicit bias within other equity-related concepts; provide examples of how implicit biases arise from our natural cognitive processes + social environments; discuss how implicit bias shows up in health care and research; and provide evidence-based ways to interrupt bias and best practices for conducting equitable research through each phase of the research process.

Pre-Work

Before the CDS live event on May 4th, please:

  1. Familiarize yourself with any terms you do not know in the Racial Equity glossary (~5-20 minutes): https://www.racialequitytools.org/glossary
  2. View Dr. Dorothy Roberts’ TED Talk (14:28): https://www.ted.com/talks/dorothy_roberts_the_problem_with_race_based_medicine?language=en

Learning Objectives

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Define equity-related concepts including implicit and explicit bias, racism and antiracism, microaggressions, privilege, and levels of oppression
  2. Communicate examples of how bias & discrimination impact patients/families (and everyone) in health care and research
  3. Identify five methods to interrupt bias in health care and research
  4. List five best practices of conducting equitable research

About the Speaker

Rebecca O’Connor, PhD, RN is an Associate Professor in the University of Washington School of Nursing, a Betty Irene Moore Nurse Leaders and Innovators Fellow, and Affiliate Member of the Center for Pediatric Nursing Research at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Her research, teaching, and service reflect her commitment to antiracism and furthering diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Dr. O’Connor recognizes that multiple historical and structural barriers in the US prevent many marginalized populations from achieving health equity and dissuades their participation in clinical research, further exacerbating inequities. To address the former, her current research seeks to reduce disparities in marginalized youth by describing and ultimately interrupting factors like implicit bias that negatively affect health care providers’ decision-making.

Dr. O’Connor also provides implicit bias training for undergraduate nursing students, interdisciplinary health sciences graduate students, Seattle Children’s Research Institute teams, and the National T3 Interprofessional Team Development Training for Health Sciences Faculty. To address a lack of diversity among clinical research participants, she works with Seattle Children’s and the Institute of Translational Health Sciences as they partner with communities to ensure that future research benefits us all. Through her Innovative Educator Fellowship, Dr. O’Connor developed and leads an annual 3-day DEI Teaching Institutes in the School of Nursing that resulted in statistically significant increases in DEI-related teaching self-efficacy among faculty who attended. She recently secured additional funding to develop virtual reality simulations that will explore the impact of implicit bias on nursing care among undergraduate and graduate nursing students and her project for the Betty Irene Moore Fellowship seeks to transform clinical nursing education by making implicit bias a central focus in all patient encounters. Dr. O’Connor received the School of Nursing’s student-nominated Excellence in Promoting Diversity Through Teaching in 2016, 2018, and 2019.

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